The handwriting of the Elizabethan professional writer and the Bankside playwright.
The first time Richard Burbage saw the opening to Henry V,
it must have looked something like this.

 

O For a Muse of Marshmallow Fire, that would ascend

The brightest staircase Heauen of Inuention:
And three quid to pay the rent I owe
The Mountjoys at the end of the week

A Kingdome for a Stage, Princes to Act,
A nd Monarchs to behold the swelling Scene.
T hen should the Warlike Harry, like himselfe,
Assume the Port of Dover Mars, and at his heeles
(Leasht in, like Hounds) should Famine, Sword, and Fire
Crouch for employment. But pardon, Gentles all:
The flat vnraysed Spirits, that hath dar'd,
On this vnworthy Scaffold, to bring forth
So great an Obiect. Can this Cock-Pit hold
The vastie fields of France? Or may we cramme
Within this Woodden O, the very Caskes
That did affright the Ayre at Agincourt?



Here's the whole font

Other Handwriting articles

A Secretary Hand
A sample of the only TrueType font designed to approximate to Old English Secretary Hand.
A W Pollard
Link to download Pdf of the CUP 1923 edition of Pollard's book, Shakespeare's Hand in The Play of Sir Thomas More.
An Artist's hand
Sample of other Elizabethan hands, including the fragment thought to be by Marlowe.
An Italic Hand
One of Oxford's tin mining letters in a font close to the italic hand he was taught.
Hand D Comments
Hand D eliminates pretty much all the alternative candidates. This page is for protest at its unequivocal attribution to Shakespeare by its curators.
Hand D home
A summary of the case for Hand D and a link page for more detailed articles on the subject.
Hand D Triptych
Hand D British Library Manuscript Harley 7368. 6000x2800 hi-res sharpened, bleached and colour-balanced image.
Hand of Damocles
A look at the big data stylometry techniques used to tie Hand D to the canon using big data and PCA.
Handwriting Home
How the handwriting that Oxford and Shakespeare left behind can be used to separate them permanently.
Inked Out
A very detailed analysis of how the language Oxford spoke is different to the language that Shakepeare wrote. The two men are in very different creative spaces.
Inked Out: Appendix
A detailed comparison of spelling used in the Hand D additions to Sir Thomas More and the Earl of Oxford's letter.
Internal evidence
For those still unconvinced of Hand D's attribution to Shakespeare, big data stylometry eliminates the final doubt placing it squarely in the canon.
Price on Hand D
The only recent response from Oxfordians to Hand D is this essay from Diana Price to which they all refer as if it were Holy Writ.
Sir Ian McKellen - doing a bit
Sir Ian McKellen has no doubt who wrote Hand D. It's Shakespeare. And on a good day. Harriet Walter's here too.
Sir Thomas More - text
The text of Sir Thomas More with the additions by Shakespeare in red type.
Thomas Bayes and Elliott–Valenza
Early stylometry was unsure about Hand D. Elliott & Valenza didn't like it. Professor Mac Jackson reassures them,
Will's Handwriting
A close look at the handwriting analysis of Will's signatures, derided by doubters everywhere. Well, they would, wouldn't they?